Human Biological Samples

Source research with confidence, transparency and visibility

Corner Bubbles

Source thousands of different types of human biosamples
From hundreds of global service providers


Human biological samples (HBS) are used across the entire drug discovery research pipeline. They are an invaluable resource for target discovery, target validation, lead optimization, translational research and clinical development.

At Scientist.com we define human biological samples as biological materials acquired or derived from living or deceased human beings collected via intervention for research purposes only or part of the standard care, including but not limited to the following:

  • Human tissue—fresh, frozen, fixed or processed (e.g., sectioned)
  • All human blood (e.g., peripheral or umbilical cord) and blood byproducts (e.g., serum, plasma, buffy coat)
  • All human biofluids (e.g., sputum, urine, bile)
  • Human primary cells derived from human biosamples
  • DNA derived from individual donors

Reducing the risks associated with sourcing human biosamples
Ensure that samples are handled with care and sourced ethically


Any missteps in the sourcing process can lead to detrimental financial and reputational outcomes for organizations.

In 2015, Scientist.com launched an award-winning compliance platform called COMPLi® to answer these (and many more) questions and reduce the risk inherent in sourcing human samples. The COMPLi® framework minimizes risk through a comprehensive and proprietary due diligence process conducted on all providers offering human biological samples, as well as on users requesting samples for scientific research.

COMPLi® ensures visibility, traceability and transparency of sample usage without sacrificing quality or ethics. Scientist.com has human sample sourcing experts on staff to help guide supplier selection and to troubleshoot any problems that arise.

Search with confidence for suppliers of:

  • FFPE
  • PBMC
  • Serum
  • Biofluids
  • Cardiac cells
  • Fixed, frozen and fresh tissue
  • Hepatic cells
  • DNA/RNA
  • Whole blood
  • Platelets
  • and many other human sample types

We ask key questions, such as:

  • Has the donor provided consent?
  • From where have the samples been sourced?
  • Do the samples meet national and international regulations?
  • Was collection reviewed by an ethics committee?
  • Does the sourcing organization have data protection policies in place?
  • Have donor identity protection policies been applied?